parachute

That time a pilot survived a B-52 airplane crash despite no obvious exit, no safe landing zone, and two failed parachute deployments – from a plane carrying 2 atomic bombs.

Stop me if you've heard this one before. A pilot survives a plane crash against all odds, despite having no exit point from the crashing plane, no safe zone to land in, and two failed parachute deployments on the way down. Did I mention the airplane was carrying two nuclear bombs? Did I mention one of the radioactive bombs is still buried under a cotton field- in North Carolina? The Operation Chrome Dome program January 1961 was just a typical day for the eight pilots aboard a B-52 bomber. Operation Chrome Dome was in full swing. For 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, multiple B-52 bombers carrying two Mark-39 hydrogen thermonuclear atomic bombs flew above the Northern Hemisphere, waiting for Russia to make a false

64-year-old man on guest “joyride” in Air Force jet accidentally ejects himself from the plane.

An unnamed 64-year-old French man received a surprise gift from his co-workers – a ride in a Dassault Rafale B jet. He arrived at the airport with no knowledge of the gift he was about to receive. He had no aviation experience and had no desire to fly. Before takeoff, his smartwatch recorded his heart rate as 136 to 142 beats per minute. Unknown to his co-workers, the man was so stressed, “his heart was in full tachycardia”. However, the man refused to look a gift horse in the mouth and would not back out. He boarded the plane, a French Airforce Rafale B jet that reaches speeds of more than 870 miles per hour, and set out on a three-plane training mission. When the plane reached

Emergency ejection results in 40-minute ordeal as pilot is flung about inside a thunderstorm cloud

The next time you feel like complaining about turbulence while flying aboard a commercial airlines, consider the situation Lieutenant Colonel William Henry Rankin survived after ejecting from his F-8 jet fighter that was flying Mach .82, at 47,000 feet, above a thunderstorm. To date, Rankin is the only known person to survive a fall through a cumulonimbus thunderstorm cloud.  He paid one heck of a price for his adventure. On July 26, 1959, Rankin was flying from Naval Air Station South in Weymouth, Massachusetts to Marine Corps Air Station in Beaufort, South Carolina. Seeing that he was approaching a thunderstorm ahead, he increased the speed of his F-8 Crusader jet to over 600 MPH and climbed to 47,000 feet in order to pass safely above the thunderstorm cloud.