nazi

Has the legendary Nazi Gold Train been found at last?

What are the Nazi “gold trains”? The “Nazi Gold Trains”, also known as the Walbrzych gold trains, are legendary Nazi German-era trains, laden with gold and treasures, rumored to have been buried underground toward the end of World War II. At the time, Germans in Poland were in retreat from the advancing Russian army. Witnesses report seeing the trains being hastily loaded in Wroclaw (eastern Poland) and leaving in a south-western direction. According to legend, the trains left Wroclaw (named Breslau at the time) filled with gold, jewelry, and stolen artwork as well as documents and experimental military technology. The trains were never seen again. Why is it believed that treasure was loaded onto the trains?  Witnesses say it was apparent that whatever was loaded onto the trains was very

Nazi SS commander found living peacefully in modest Minnesota suburb

The Associated Press is reporting today that a top commander of a Nazi SS-led unit accused of burning villages filled with women and children, lied to American immigration officials to get into the United States and has been living in a modest house in northeast Minneapolis, in an area with a significant Ukrainian population, since shortly after World War II.  According to AP, Michael Karkoc, 94, told American authorities in 1949 that he had performed no military service during World War II, concealing his work as an officer and founding member of the SS-led Ukrainian Self Defense Legion and later as an officer in the SS Galician Division.  The division that Karkoc reportedly commanded, was responsible for "liquidating" the inhabitants of the village of Chlaniow.

Odessa – hiding Nazi war criminals

ODESSA, (German Organisation der ehemaligen SS-Angehörigen, “Organization of Former SS Members”) is believed to have been an international Nazi network set up toward the end of World War II by a group of SS officers in order to avoid their capture and prosecution for war crimes. A fictional account of the organization was manifest in Frederick Forsyth's 1972 best-seller thriller The Odessa File. Forsyth's ODESSA smuggled war criminals to Latin America. However, several authoritative books by professionals involved in the U.S. War Crimes Commission (including T.H. Tetens and Joseph Wechsberg) have verified the organization's existence and given details of its operations. Wechsberg studied Simon Wiesenthal's memoirs on ODESSA and verified them with his own experiences in the book The Murderers Among Us. The purpose of ODESSA